History Hair
History Hair
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edwardian-time-machine:

Consuelo Vanderbilt, 1902.
Source
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doxiequeen1:

Finally a few half decent photos of my Isabel de Requesens dress! At some point i’ll set up a nice backdrop with drapery and candles, but for right now these will have to do.
The costume was drafted, made, and worn by me. The design was based off of a painting created by Raphael and Gulio Romano in the early 1500s. 
It’s made from linen and velvet. Aside from boning channels and skirt seams it was entirely hand sewn. The embroidery and beading were done by hand as well.
I have several detailed blog posts about the project, which can be found here, and a few videos on making it which are here! 
doxiequeen1:

Finally a few half decent photos of my Isabel de Requesens dress! At some point i’ll set up a nice backdrop with drapery and candles, but for right now these will have to do.
The costume was drafted, made, and worn by me. The design was based off of a painting created by Raphael and Gulio Romano in the early 1500s. 
It’s made from linen and velvet. Aside from boning channels and skirt seams it was entirely hand sewn. The embroidery and beading were done by hand as well.
I have several detailed blog posts about the project, which can be found here, and a few videos on making it which are here! 
doxiequeen1:

Finally a few half decent photos of my Isabel de Requesens dress! At some point i’ll set up a nice backdrop with drapery and candles, but for right now these will have to do.
The costume was drafted, made, and worn by me. The design was based off of a painting created by Raphael and Gulio Romano in the early 1500s. 
It’s made from linen and velvet. Aside from boning channels and skirt seams it was entirely hand sewn. The embroidery and beading were done by hand as well.
I have several detailed blog posts about the project, which can be found here, and a few videos on making it which are here! 
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lost-in-centuries-long-gone:

4/28/06 Vintage Freebie 10 by ArtByChrysti on Flickr.
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starry-eyed-wolfchild:

The Braided Rapunzels of Africa
The hairstyle currently making you do a double-take is known as Eembuvi Braids, worn by women of the Mbalantu tribes from the Namibia. It’s a style that requires preparation from a young age, usually around twelve years old, when Mbalantu girls use thick layers of finely ground tree bark and oils– a mixture that is said to be the secret to growing their hair to such lengths.The girls will live with this thick fat-mixture on their scalp for several years before it’s loosened and the hair becomes visible. It will then be braided and styled into various gravity-defying headresses throughout their life.
starry-eyed-wolfchild:

The Braided Rapunzels of Africa
The hairstyle currently making you do a double-take is known as Eembuvi Braids, worn by women of the Mbalantu tribes from the Namibia. It’s a style that requires preparation from a young age, usually around twelve years old, when Mbalantu girls use thick layers of finely ground tree bark and oils– a mixture that is said to be the secret to growing their hair to such lengths.The girls will live with this thick fat-mixture on their scalp for several years before it’s loosened and the hair becomes visible. It will then be braided and styled into various gravity-defying headresses throughout their life.
starry-eyed-wolfchild:

The Braided Rapunzels of Africa
The hairstyle currently making you do a double-take is known as Eembuvi Braids, worn by women of the Mbalantu tribes from the Namibia. It’s a style that requires preparation from a young age, usually around twelve years old, when Mbalantu girls use thick layers of finely ground tree bark and oils– a mixture that is said to be the secret to growing their hair to such lengths.The girls will live with this thick fat-mixture on their scalp for several years before it’s loosened and the hair becomes visible. It will then be braided and styled into various gravity-defying headresses throughout their life.
starry-eyed-wolfchild:

The Braided Rapunzels of Africa
The hairstyle currently making you do a double-take is known as Eembuvi Braids, worn by women of the Mbalantu tribes from the Namibia. It’s a style that requires preparation from a young age, usually around twelve years old, when Mbalantu girls use thick layers of finely ground tree bark and oils– a mixture that is said to be the secret to growing their hair to such lengths.The girls will live with this thick fat-mixture on their scalp for several years before it’s loosened and the hair becomes visible. It will then be braided and styled into various gravity-defying headresses throughout their life.
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1913
by Gentej
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nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty
This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces. Interesting notes"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘八’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)
nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty
This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces. Interesting notes"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘八’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)
nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty
This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces. Interesting notes"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘八’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)
nannaia:

Painted Eyebrow Trends in Tang Dynasty
This is a chart showing different eyebrow trends in the Tang Dynasty. It’s based on a chart in Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei and Gao Chunming (2004), on pg 37. I wanted to create a chart that had the eyebrows on faces. Interesting notes"Women of the Tang Dynasty paid particular attention to facial appearance, and the application of powder or even rouge was common practice. Some women’s foreheads were painted dark yellow and the dai (a kind of dark blue pigment) was used to paint their eyebrows into different shapes that were called dai mei(painted eyebrows) in general. There were literally a dozen ways to pait the eyebrows and between the brows there was a colourful decoration called hua dian, which was made of specks of gold, silver and emerald feather.” (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)"…during the years of Yuanho in the reign of Xuanzong the system of costumes changed, and women no longer applied red powder to their faces; instead, they used only black ointment for their lips and made their eyebrows like like the Chinese character ‘八’." (5000 Years of Chinese Costume, 77)The black lipstick style “was called the ‘weeping makeup’ or ‘tears makeup’.” (Chinese Clothing by Hua Mei, 37)
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edwardian-time-machine:

1910
Source
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lost-in-centuries-long-gone:

Lady from a 1913 Valentine by B-Kay on Flickr.
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Imperial children in 1910
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vintageeveryday:

Beautiful color pictures of Canadian Women’s Army Corps during The World War II. See more here…
vintageeveryday:

Beautiful color pictures of Canadian Women’s Army Corps during The World War II. See more here…
vintageeveryday:

Beautiful color pictures of Canadian Women’s Army Corps during The World War II. See more here…
vintageeveryday:

Beautiful color pictures of Canadian Women’s Army Corps during The World War II. See more here…
vintageeveryday:

Beautiful color pictures of Canadian Women’s Army Corps during The World War II. See more here…
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end-of-monarchy:

This image is dated as ‘1900 Edwardian ladies’ I’m not sure if this date is correct, given the hairstyles
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Edwardian Fashion
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favorite celebrity meme - 1/5 favorite hair moments - 'vikings' hairstyles

favorite celebrity meme - 1/5 favorite hair moments - 'vikings' hairstyles

favorite celebrity meme - 1/5 favorite hair moments - 'vikings' hairstyles

favorite celebrity meme - 1/5 favorite hair moments - 'vikings' hairstyles
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